Tag Archives: Academic disciplines

04Nov/22

How a quest for mathematical truth and complex models can lead to useless scientific predictions – new research

Arnald Puy, University of Birmingham

A dominant view in science is that there is a mathematical truth structuring the universe. It is assumed that the scientist’s job is to decipher these mathematical relations: once understood, they can be translated into mathematical models. Running the resulting “silicon reality” in a computer may then provide us with useful insights into how the world works.

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12Oct/22

Horrible bosses: how algorithm managers are taking over the office

Robert Donoghue, University of Bath and Tiago Vieira, European University Institute

The 1999 cult classic film Office Space depicts Peter’s dreary life as a cubicle-dwelling software engineer. Every Friday, Peter tries to avoid his boss and the dreaded words: “I’m going to need you to go ahead and come in tomorrow.”

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07Oct/22

End-to-end encryption keeps us all safe

Mallory Knodel,Ryan Polk,Sheetal Kumar

Published: October 05, 2022 | Center for Democracy & Technology

Mallory Knodel is Chief Technologist at the Center for Democracy and Technology, Ryan Polk is Director of Internet Policy at Internet Society and Sheetal Kumar is Head of Global Engagement and Advocacy at Global Partners Digital.

At the Human Rights Council in Geneva last month, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) presented the strongest endorsement of encryption yet by the world body in its report on privacy in the digital age, underlining that the technology that leverages cryptography to secure communications, is crucial to the rights to privacy, access to information, and free expression in an online world. Continue reading

23Sep/22

Women sacrifice their health to shield families from spiking costs

  • Rising inflation is widening gender gaps, say charities
  • Women report skipping medical care to feed families
  • Campaigners sound alarm over government austerity measures

By Nita Bhalla

NAIROBI, Sept 22 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – When the pain started in Agnes Wachira’s chest almost six months ago, the Kenyan mother-of-three dismissed it as a symptom of the daily grind of working long hours hand-washing clothes in the narrow lanes of Nairobi’s Kawangware informal settlement.
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15Aug/22

OPINION: Besides AI, regulation key to fight mis/disinformation

By Anya Schiffrin, director of the Technology, Media and Communications specialization at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.

When worries about online mis/disinformation became widespread after the 2016 U.S. election, there was hope that the tech giants would use artificial intelligence (AI) to fix the mess they created. The hope was that platforms could use AI and Natural Language Processing (NLP) to automatically block or downrank false. illegal or inflammatory content online without governments having to regulate.
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15Aug/22

How trauma survivors can harness spiritual contemplation to process stress – new research

Catrin Eames, Liverpool John Moores University

Trauma, such as surviving or witnessing road accidents, natural disasters and violence, can shake up our lives, challenging our core beliefs and views of the world.

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05Aug/22

ViewSonic’s Visual Solutions Ignite Love and Hope in 2022 World Women’s Art Festival

ViewSonic Corp., a leading global provider of visual solutions, partners with the Taiwan Women’s Art Association (TWAA) to create immersive art experiences at the “Love and Hope – 2022 World Women’s Art Festival”. With continuous efforts to encourage creativity, ViewSonic provides cutting-edge projectors, touch displays, and large format interactive displays to enhance the exhibiting experience. Visitors can immerse and interact with a total of 98 artworks by 70 female artists that demonstrate the strength and resilience of women. Continue reading

03Aug/22

Love Island: the psychological challenges contestants – and viewers – could face after the show is over

Rachael Molitor, Coventry University

The finale of ITV’s Love Island was watched by millions of fans, many commenting live on social media as Ekin-Su Cülcüloğlu and Davide Sanclimenti were awarded the £50,000 prize. The four couples who made the final will now leave the Majorca villa where they’ve kissed, cried and cracked on for the past eight weeks. When they enter the outside world, they will be met with massive amounts of attention.

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