Tag Archives: Creative Commons

22Nov/22

How to test if we’re living in a computer simulation

Melvin M. Vopson, University of Portsmouth

Physicists have long struggled to explain why the universe started out with conditions suitable for life to evolve. Why do the physical laws and constants take the very specific values that allow stars, planets and ultimately life to develop? The expansive force of the universe, dark energy, for example, is much weaker than theory suggests it should be – allowing matter to clump together rather than being ripped apart.

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22Nov/22

World Cup 2022: Fifa’s clampdown on rainbow armbands conflicts with its own guidance on human rights

Sophie King-Hill, University of Birmingham

The 2022 men’s World Cup host nation Qatar is known for its human rights abuses relating to women, migrant workers and those from the LGBTQ+ community. Same sex relationships in Qatar are illegal and punishable by up to seven years in prison. As Qatar is hosting one of the most popular global sporting events, these human rights abuses are now under scrutiny on the world stage.

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21Nov/22

Mozzies are everywhere right now – including giant ones and those that make us sick. Here’s what you need to know

Cameron Webb, University of Sydney

Like all insects, mosquitoes thrive in warmer weather. But what they really need is water. La Niña rainfall and flooding are providing the perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes, with numbers exploding in recent weeks.

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20Nov/22

An entire Pacific country will upload itself to the metaverse. It’s a desperate plan – with a hidden message

Nick Kelly, Queensland University of Technology and Marcus Foth, Queensland University of Technology

The Pacific nation of Tuvalu is planning to create a version of itself in the metaverse, as a response to the existential threat of rising sea levels. Tuvalu’s minister for justice, communication and foreign affairs, Simon Kofe, made the announcement via a chilling digital address to leaders at COP27.

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15Nov/22

Elon Musk: how being autistic may make him think differently

Punit Shah, University of Bath; Luca Hargitai, University of Bath, and Lucy Anne Livingston, King’s College London

The business magnate and new owner of Twitter Elon Musk revealed a while ago that he is autistic. Musk, the wealthiest person in the world, is autistic. Musk, a fellow of the prestigious Royal Society and Time’s 2021 Person of the Year, is autistic. One of the most famous people on Earth is autistic. Perhaps it is worth letting that sink in?

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07Nov/22

How can black people feel safe and have confidence in policing?

Clare Torrible, University of Bristol

The inquest into the death of Chris Kaba opened on October 4 2022. Kaba, an unarmed black man, was shot and killed in Streatham Hill, south London on September 5 2022 by a Metropolitan police officer.

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06Nov/22

Why putting your artistic calling on hold might not always be such a bad idea

Katie Bailey, King’s College London

As a boy, Terry loved music and taught himself trombone, guitar and the tuba. Right through school and university he played in the evenings in jazz groups, musical theatre and marching bands. He started work as an accountant in his early twenties, but his wide social circle in the music world meant he was still out playing gigs every evening.

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06Nov/22

What long-term opioid use does to your body and brain

Rob Poole, Bangor University

In his new autobiography, Matthew Perry reveals that his colon burst as a result of his addiction to opioid painkillers. The 53-year-old actor, who played Chandler Bing in Friends, was in a coma for two weeks following the incident and had to wear a colostomy bag for nine months.

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04Nov/22

Why Tutankhamum’s curse continues to fascinate, 100 years after his discovery

Claire Gilmour, University of Bristol

The discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922 was a monumental event for archaeology. It was the first largely intact ancient Egyptian royal tomb to be found and hence provided major insights into the burial practices of royalty. It also gave a glimpse of what other undiscovered, lost or robbed tombs of pharaohs might have been like.

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