Two women donate kidneys to each others’ husbands

In a rare instance, two women unrelated to each other donate their kidneys to give a new leash of life to each others’ husband.

BENGALURU, KARNATAKA, INDIA (JULY 03, 2015) (ANI) – In a rare instance, two women unrelated to each other donated their kidneys to give a new leash of life to each others’ husband.

A small entrepreneur, Venugopal, and a retired principal of a high school, Bhimsen Joshi, were diagnosed with kidney failure and had been on dialysis for last few years.

Wife of Venugopal, Savitri, and wife of Bhimsen Joshi, Anuradha, both wanted to donate their kidney to their husbands but doctors ruled it out due to mismatched blood group.

But in a twist of fate, Savitri’s blood group matched with Bhimsen while Anuradha’s blood group was a match for Venugopal. Both the families decided to be a support to each other.

Venugopal said it was a ray of hope for him.

“Doctor advised our wives to swap. My (blood group) is A+, my wife’s (blood group) is B+, and his (Bhimsen) wife’s (blood group) is A+, and his wife’s (blood group) is B+. My wife donated her kidney to him, and his wife did the same to me,” Venugopal said in southern Bengaluru city.

Both the families became friends during the treatment in the hospital and soon came to know about the match in their blood group.

They gave their consent to doctor Ajit K. Huilgol, chief transplant surgeon at Columbia Asia Hospital in Bangalore.

Wife of Bhimsen Joshi, Anuradha, said she wanted her husband out of dialysis bed.

“From day one, I had decided I don’t want dialysis (for him). I don’t want to see him on dialysis bed. I was ready for transplantation which is better life, which gives quality life. Dialysis, thrice in a week or sometimes four in a week, has so many consequent results – patients my get heart diseases,” said Anuradha.

Doctor Ajit K. Huilgol said the biggest challenge was the arrangement of logistics to conduct four separate surgeries.

“Challenges were doing it simultaneously. We needed two sets of surgeons, two sets anesthetists and four operations theatres and that was the challenges. Technically, surgeons are competent and it went on well,” said Huilgol.

Kidney failure has become more common in India because of rising obesity, pollution and contaminated food grains.