Tag Archives: European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Act

10Nov/17

Brexit never? Britain can still change its mind, says Article 50 author

LONDON, ENGLAND, UK (NOVEMBER 10, 2017) (UK POOL) – Prime Minister Theresa May should stop misleading voters and admit that Brexit can be avoided if Britain decides unilaterally to scrap divorce talks, the man who drafted Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty said on Friday (November 10). Continue reading

29Sep/17

May sees good progress on ensuring citizens’ rights

British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Friday Brexit negotiators had made “good progress” toward agreeing the rights of expatriate citizens and that she was committed to encouraging Europeans to stay in Britain. Continue reading

12Sep/17

Brexit bill wins UK parliamentary vote

Britain’s parliament backs legislation to sever ties with the European Union, a reprieve for Prime Minister Theresa May who now faces demands by lawmakers for concessions before it becomes law. Graham Mackay reports. Continue reading

06Sep/17

Britain could still reverse Brexit, former minister Heseltine says

LONDON, ENGLAND, UNITED KINGDOM (SEPTEMBER 5, 2017) (REUTERS) – Brexit could be reversed if economic pain prompts a change in public opinion that brings a new generation of political leaders to power in Britain, former Conservative minister Michael Heseltine said.
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17Jul/17

UK politicians feud as full Brexit talks begin

British and European Union envoys on Monday began a first round of negotiations on Britain’s divorce from the EU with both sides saying it was high time to tackle details, though feuding within the London cabinet over Brexit terms may trouble the process. Kate King reports. Continue reading

29Mar/17

UK Prime Minister Theresa May officially triggers Brexit

UK Prime Minister Theresa May speaks in the House of Commons to file formal Brexit divorce papers, pitching the United Kingdom into the unknown and triggering years of uncertain negotiations that will test the endurance of the European Union. Continue reading

29Mar/17

Countdown to Brexit begins saddening Londoners

The countdown to Article 50 being triggered begins and Londoners feel sad about the prospect of Brexit.

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27Mar/17

The road to Brexit – a timeline of events as May prepares to trigger Article 50

The road to Brexit has been a tumultuous one, with protests and lawsuits and a bitterly divided country. British Prime Minister Theresa May will trigger Article 50 on Wednesday (March 29) which means official talks on Britain leaving the European Union can begin.

VILLACOUBLAY AIRPORT, NEAR PARIS, FRANCE (REUTERS) – On Wednesday (March 29) British Prime Minister Theresa May will trigger Article 50, which will formally kickstart the process of Britain leaving the European Union.

It comes nine months after 2016’s June 23 referendum in which Britons voted to leave 52 percent to 48 percent.

The result divided the country, with remain voters feeling their wishes and concerns are being ignored.

The Supreme Court ruled earlier this year that parliament must approve May triggering Article 50. This angered the Leave camp, which believed pro-Europe campaigners were trying to subvert the result of the referendum.

Last weekend, leaders of the remaining 27 states met without departing Britain for a summit that they hope could relaunch the Union in the city where it was founded 60 years earlier. The Treaty of Rome, creating the European Economic Community (EEC) of France, Germany, Italy and the Benelux, was signed on March 25, 1957.

20Mar/17

Britain’s May to launch EU divorce proceedings on March 29

British PM May confirms Britain will trigger EU exit proceedings on March 29.

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20Mar/17

Worried EU nationals struggle with UK residency rules ahead of Brexit

As British Prime Minister Theresa May announces March 29 as the day she will trigger Article 50, officially kick-starting the process for the UK to leave the European Union, EU nationals living in Britain are seriously worried about their future status as they grapple with complex British residency rules – which often results in rejection.

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