Sceptics deny ‘climate crisis’ as international climate talks continue in Paris

Climate change sceptics deny any climate crisis, calling on world leaders to dedicate funds to adapt to climate change rather than try to fight it.

PARIS, FRANCE (DECEMBER 7, 2015) (REUTERS) – goes to trying to stop climate change. Only six percent of the one billion dollars a day that is spent around the world on climate finance, only six percent of it goes to helping people today, helping them adapt to climate change, helping them survive whatever is going to happen and that is a real tragedy, the Africans are furious, many of the developing countries know they need help but they can’t get it because the U.N. and developed countries are spending so much money on trying to stop what might happen in 50 years. And that, really, we think is immoral.”

14. BOOKS ON CLIMATE CHANGE

15. BOOK TITLED “UNITED NATIONS CLIMATE LIARS”

STORY: U.S. lobby groups seeking to undermine talks at the United Nations climate summit held a meeting in Paris on Monday (December 7), denying a climate crisis and calling on world leaders to dedicate funds to adapt to climate change rather than try to fight it.

Outside the Hotel California in central Paris, where the meeting was held, a dozen demonstrators shouted slogans and held up signs reading “Let Them Eat Coal.” Inside the hotel, in a small half-empty room, a handful of protesters shouted down representatives from the Heartland Institute as they attempted to hold a news conference on what they say is U.N.’s “junk science”.

Senior officials from almost 200 nations approved a draft text of a United Nations climate deal on Saturday at the Paris climate conference, after four years’ work as the basis for ministers to try to resolve hundreds of points of disagreement next week.

But representative for the Heartland Institute, James Taylor, said that humans were not creating a climate crisis.

“Humans are causing some warming, but the impact of that warming is very modest, it’s more positive than negative. Warmer temperatures have always benefited human health and welfare and continue to do so and most importantly of all we are not creating a climate crisis,” he said.

Environmental groups, U.N. officials, many governments and business leaders say scientific consensus on climate change means the time for debate is over, and claim opposition will only delay much-needed action.

But Taylor said action should be focused on giving access to affordable energy to everybody so people can spend more on other considerations.

“I think the best thing to do is to make sure that people have access to affordable energy that will allow them to have more money for nutrition, for healthcare, education, good housing, things that make our lives longer, happier and healthier. And yes we should continue to monitor the science because we want to make sure that if the scientific evidence leads us elsewhere and tells us things are getting too warm, we’ll notice that. But right now the science doesn’t show it,” he said.

Executive Director of the International climate Science coalition, Tom Harris, who also attended the meeting, said more money should be spent by world leaders on adapting to climate change, rather than trying to fight it.

“It’s the great tragedy that is happening around the world where very few people are given the adaptation funding they need to adapt to climate change. So you have people in the north of Canada whose homes are falling down because of permafrost is melting, people in Africa who are having droughts due to natural climate cycles. They can’t get the money they need to adapt, because groups like Greenpeace and others have convinced governments that we control climate change. Almost all the money, 94 percent of it, goes to trying to stop climate change,” he said.

“Almost all the money, 94 percent of it, goes to trying to stop climate change. Only six percent of the one billion dollars a day that is spent around the world on climate finance, only six percent of it goes to helping people today, helping them adapt to climate change, helping them survive whatever is going to happen and that is a real tragedy, the Africans are furious, many of the developing countries know they need help but they can’t get it because the U.N. and developed countries are spending so much money on trying to stop what might happen in 50 years. And that, really, we think is immoral,” Harris added.

Over the weekend, senior government officials signed off on a draft text at the COP21 meeting, running to 42 pages, minutes before a midday (1100 GMT) deadline after working through the night.

Many nations said the draft, the result of four years of work since the process was launched in Durban in 2011, left too many issues unresolved.

Many believe that the question of more funds to help poor nations cope with climate change will be the make-or-break issue.

Poor nations say they are far more vulnerable than the rich to powerful hurricanes, heat waves, droughts and rising sea levels and want clear promises that aid will rise from an existing goal of 100 billion U.S. dollars a year by 2020.