Category Archives: Human Interest

15Nov/22

Elon Musk: how being autistic may make him think differently

Punit Shah, University of Bath; Luca Hargitai, University of Bath, and Lucy Anne Livingston, King’s College London

The business magnate and new owner of Twitter Elon Musk revealed a while ago that he is autistic. Musk, the wealthiest person in the world, is autistic. Musk, a fellow of the prestigious Royal Society and Time’s 2021 Person of the Year, is autistic. One of the most famous people on Earth is autistic. Perhaps it is worth letting that sink in?

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06Nov/22

Why putting your artistic calling on hold might not always be such a bad idea

Katie Bailey, King’s College London

As a boy, Terry loved music and taught himself trombone, guitar and the tuba. Right through school and university he played in the evenings in jazz groups, musical theatre and marching bands. He started work as an accountant in his early twenties, but his wide social circle in the music world meant he was still out playing gigs every evening.

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04Nov/22

Why Tutankhamum’s curse continues to fascinate, 100 years after his discovery

Claire Gilmour, University of Bristol

The discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922 was a monumental event for archaeology. It was the first largely intact ancient Egyptian royal tomb to be found and hence provided major insights into the burial practices of royalty. It also gave a glimpse of what other undiscovered, lost or robbed tombs of pharaohs might have been like.

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24Oct/22

Why are so many people delighted by disgusting things?

Bradley J. Irish, Arizona State University

Halloween is a time to embrace all that is disgusting, from bloody slasher films to haunted houses full of fake guts and gore.

But the attraction to stuff that grosses us out goes beyond this annual holiday.

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23Oct/22

Why is 13 considered unlucky? Explaining the power of its bad reputation

Many elevators do not have a floor numbered 13 because of common superstitions about the number.
Luis Alvarez/DigitalVision via Getty Images

Barry Markovsky, University of South Carolina Continue reading

13Oct/22

African-Focused Press Dazzles Critics: Iskanchi inaugural catalog gaining critical acclaim

“People want to read Africa,” says University of Utah professor Kenechi Uzor of Iskanchi Press, a newly-launched independent publisher. All signs point to Uzor being correct as he works to bring a global and diverse perspective to the Western publishing world by providing English-translated and original works from African writers. Continue reading

07Oct/22

Do we have free will – and do we want it? Thomas the Tank Engine offers clues

Matyáš Moravec, University of St Andrews

Are we free or are our actions determined by the laws of physics? And how much free will do we actually want? These questions have troubled philosophers for millennia – and there are still no perfect answers.

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13Sep/22

King Charles inherits crown with support for monarchy at record low – but future not set in stone

John Curtice, University of Strathclyde

The death of Queen Elizabeth II after 70 years on the throne has, of course, been met with widespread sadness and mourning. For most people in Britain, she is the only monarch they have known. Yet, inevitably, the mourning of her passing will be followed by a discussion about the future of the monarchy as an institution. After all, much has changed since 1951.

Although it may have provided the head of state for over a thousand years, in a modern democracy like Britain the monarchy will need to retain public consent if it is to survive.

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