Tag Archives: SHUTTERSTOCK

05Feb/23

Six parts of your car that gather data on you

Rachael Medhurst, University of South Wales

You can tell a lot about someone from the car they drive. The data that many vehicles now collect can reveal the patterns of our daily lives and provide insights into our behaviour, actions and even our state of mind.

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Unlike with academics and reporters, you can’t check when ChatGPT’s telling the truth

Blayne Haggart, Brock University

Of all the reactions elicited by ChatGPT, the chatbot from the American for-profit company OpenAI that produces grammatically correct responses to natural-language queries, few have matched those of educators and academics.

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27Jan/23

ChatGPT: why education should embrace the AI chatbot, not shun it

Brian Lucey, Trinity College Dublin and Michael Dowling, Dublin City University

Just under two months ago, the US artificial intelligence company OpenAI introduced a program called ChatGPT. Essentially an advanced chatbot, it has been the subject of much debate.

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21Jan/23

How to talk to someone about conspiracy theories in five simple steps

Daniel Jolley, University of Nottingham; Karen Douglas, University of Kent, and Mathew Marques, La Trobe University

People’s first instinct when engaging with conspiracy believers is often to try and debunk their ideas with factual and authoritative information.

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19Jan/23

How to spot a cyberbot – five tips to keep your device safe

How to spot a cyberbot – five tips to keep your device safe

Malware is designed to hide in your device
Jaiz Anuar/Shutterstock

Adrian Winckles, Anglia Ruskin University and Andrew Moore, Anglia Ruskin University

You may know nothing about it, but your phone – or your laptop or tablet – could be taken over by someone else who has found their way in through a back door. They could have infected your device with malware to make it a “bot” or a “zombie” and be using it – perhaps with hundreds of other unwitting victims’ phones – to launch a cyberattack.

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19Jan/23

How the Fifa20 video game reproduces the racial stereotypes embedded within football

Lutsenko_Oleksandr | Shutterstock

Paul Ian Campbell, University of Leicester and Marcus Maloney, Coventry University

EA Sports’ Fifa football videogame series is arguably the most successful sports gaming franchise of all time. Since its debut in 1993, it has sold over 260 million copies across 29 iterations. This position was reaffirmed in 2022, with its latest instalment, Fifa23, reported as the UK’s highest selling videogame at Christmas.

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13Jan/23

2022 wasn’t the year of Cleopatra – so why was she the most viewed page on Wikipedia?

Taha Yasseri, University College Dublin

At the end of every year, I gather statistics on the most viewed Wikipedia articles of the year. This helps me, a computational social scientist, understand what topics captured the most attention and gives me a chance to reflect on the major public events of the year. I try to use data to determine how the public (and more specifically here, English-language Wikipedia readers) will collectively remember the past year.

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21Dec/22

Why do people feel lonely at Christmas? Here’s what the research says

Andrea Wigfield, Sheffield Hallam University and John Ratcliffe, Sheffield Hallam University

Christmas is said to be a time for connecting with friends, family and having fun. But it can also be time of loneliness. Indeed, the results of a 2018 survey looking at loneliness during Christmas time in the UK revealed that 17% of people felt more lonely over the festive period.

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17Dec/22

Bad hangovers? Why genetics, personality and coping mechanisms can make a difference

Craig Gunn, University of Bristol

After a good night out you may not be surprised when you wake up feeling rough the next morning. But what may surprise you is if your friends aren’t feeling the same way. Some may feel worse, some better and some (if they’re lucky) may not feel any of the negative consequences at all.

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15Dec/22

Why I’m righting the wrongs of my early research and sharing my scientific data with local communities

Sallie Burrough, University of Oxford

“You know what’s wrong with scientific power? It’s a form of inherited wealth. And you know what assholes congenitally rich people are.” That’s how filmmaker Michael Crichton put it in Jurassic Park nearly 30 years ago. The problem of scientific colonialism has not, however, gone away.

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