Tag Archives: Creative Commons

30Sep/23

Suella Braverman is wrong about the UN refugee convention being ‘not fit for purpose’ – here’s why

Robert Oakes, United Nations University and Talitha Dubow, United Nations University

The UK’s home secretary, Suella Braverman – the minister responsible for setting immigration policy – has said the United Nation’s refugee convention is not “fit for our modern age” and should be renegotiated.

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28Sep/23

Does AI have a right to free speech? Only if it supports our right to free thought

Simon McCarthy-Jones, Trinity College Dublin

The world has witnessed breathtaking advances in generative artificial intelligence (AI), with ChatGPT being one of the best known examples. To prevent harm and misuse of the technology, politicians are now considering regulating AI. Yet they face an overlooked barrier: AI may have a right to free speech.

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26Sep/23

Donald Trump’s truth: why liars might sometimes be considered honest – new research

Stephan Lewandowsky, University of Bristol and Jana Lasser, Graz University of Technology

According to fact checkers, Donald Trump made more than 30,000 false or misleading claims during his presidency. That’s around 20 a day. But, according to several opinion polls during his presidency, around 75% of Republican voters still considered Trump to be honest.

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23Sep/23

How BookTok trends are influencing what you read – whether you use TikTok or not

Natalie Wall, University of Liverpool

If you’ve been in a bookshop recently, you may have seen references to BookTok – whether it’s stickers on books or whole tables dedicated to “BookTok favourites”.

BookTok is a community on the social media app TikTok. Creators make short videos recommending, reviewing, or just generally chatting about books. This community has become one of the biggest on the platform and its hashtag (#BookTok) has been used on over 60 billion videos. BookTok’s influence over the publishing industry and what young people are reading is staggering.

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22Sep/23

Rupert Murdoch and the rise and fall of the press barons: how much power do newspapers still have?

Simon Potter, University of Bristol

Global media tycoon Rupert Murdoch has announced his retirement as chairman of Fox and News Corp, making way for his son Lachlan. He has been demonised as a puppet master who would pull the strings of politicians behind the scenes, as a man with too much power. But what influence did he and his fellow media moguls really wield?

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09Sep/23

Heatwaves and hot temperatures are hard on the body – but a series of in-built adaptations make it easier to cope

Adam Taylor, Lancaster University

Record-breaking temperatures have been recorded in many countries in 2023. In some parts of Europe, summer temperatures even exceeded 45℃.

While this kind of heat can be uncomfortable, our body is built with many adaptations that help it continue to function when it’s hot.

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02Sep/23

Winnie and Mandela biography: a masterful tale of South Africa’s troubled, iconic power couple

Gavin Evans, Birkbeck, University of London

A new book on South African liberation struggle icons Nelson and Winnie Mandela is a masterful biography of the pair. It’s a work of scholarship involving an immense body of primary and secondary research, written with flair and panache but in an easy and compelling style, making it accessible to anyone with an interest in politics, power and South Africa and looks set to become the definitive work on them.

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01Sep/23

New Alzheimer’s drugs don’t deserve the hype – here’s why

Sebastian Walsh, University of Cambridge

A prominent childhood memory is of my grandparents living with and then dying from dementia. As is universal with dementia, there was a double blow: watching my grandparents lose their identity and seeing the suffering of those closest to them.

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29Aug/23

International ransomware gangs are evolving their techniques. The next generation of hackers will target weaknesses in cryptocurrencies

Alpesh Bhudia, Royal Holloway University of London; Anna Cartwright, Oxford Brookes University; Darren Hurley-Smith, Royal Holloway University of London, and Edward Cartwright, De Montfort University

In May 2023, the Dallas City Government was hugely disrupted by a ransomware attack. Ransomware attacks are so-called because the hackers behind them encrypt vital data and demand a ransom in order to get the information decrypted.

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26Aug/23

Yevgeny Prigozhin: Wagner Group boss joins long list of those who challenged Vladimir Putin and paid the price

Stefan Wolff, University of Birmingham

Two months after challenging Vladimir Putin’s leadership in an apparent but abortive “mutiny”, Yevgeny Prigozhin – the former owner of the mercenary private military company Wagner Group – has joined a long list of prominent Russians to die in mysterious circumstances.

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