Tag Archives: SHUTTERSTOCK

04Nov/22

How a quest for mathematical truth and complex models can lead to useless scientific predictions – new research

Arnald Puy, University of Birmingham

A dominant view in science is that there is a mathematical truth structuring the universe. It is assumed that the scientist’s job is to decipher these mathematical relations: once understood, they can be translated into mathematical models. Running the resulting “silicon reality” in a computer may then provide us with useful insights into how the world works.

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01Nov/22

Omicron BQ.1 and BQ.1.1 – an expert answers three key questions about these new COVID variants

Manal Mohammed, University of Westminster

Two new omicron subvariants, BQ.1 and BQ.1.1, are quickly gaining traction in the US, collectively accounting for 27% of infections as of October 29. Both are descendants of BA.5, the omicron variant that has dominated around the world for some months.

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29Oct/22

Are butter boards bad for you? An expert view on the latest food trend

Duane Mellor, Aston University

In an unexpected twist, butter seems to be back on the menu. After years of being a maligned ingredient that many people shied away from, butter has now become the latest food trend on social media, thanks to the recent popularity of “butter boards”.

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The whole world is facing a debt crisis – but richer countries can afford to stop it

Patrick E. Shea, University of Glasgow

Countries across the world are drifting towards a debt crisis. Economic slowdowns and rising inflation have increased demands on spending, making it almost impossible for many governments to pay back the money they owe.

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12Oct/22

How many work projects are too many? Here’s why you should tell your boss to stop at five

Anatoli Colicev, University of Liverpool and Tuuli Hakkarainen, University of Liverpool

Working across several projects is the norm for most jobs these days. In fact, more than 80% of employees juggle multiple work projects at once, according to recent research.

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12Oct/22

Horrible bosses: how algorithm managers are taking over the office

Robert Donoghue, University of Bath and Tiago Vieira, European University Institute

The 1999 cult classic film Office Space depicts Peter’s dreary life as a cubicle-dwelling software engineer. Every Friday, Peter tries to avoid his boss and the dreaded words: “I’m going to need you to go ahead and come in tomorrow.”

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04Oct/22

Nobel prize: Svante Pääbo’s ancient DNA discoveries offer clues as to what makes us human

Love Dalén, Stockholm University and Anders Götherström, Stockholm University

The Nobel prize in physiology or medicine for 2022 has been awarded to Svante Pääbo from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, “for his discoveries concerning the genomes of extinct hominins and human evolution”.

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26Sep/22

To reach net zero the world still needs mining. After 26 years, here’s what I’ve learned about this ‘evil’ industry

Bridget Storrie, UCL

On the wooded hill above the Stan Terg lead and zinc mine in Kosovo, there is an old concrete diving platform looming over what was once an open-air swimming pool. Before the break-up of Yugoslavia, people who worked at the mine would bring their families here to swim, sunbathe on the wide terrace with its view across the valley, and picnic among the trees. Now the pool is slowly disappearing into the forest, the view obscured by birch saplings.

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24Sep/22

Mini budget 2022: experts react to the new UK government’s spending and tax-cut plans

Phil Tomlinson, University of Bath; Andrew Burlinson, University of East Anglia; Catherine Waddams, University of East Anglia; Donald Hirsch, Loughborough University; Jean-Philippe Serbera, Sheffield Hallam University; Jim Watson, UCL; Jonquil Lowe, The Open University, and Steven McCabe, Birmingham City University

UK chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng has just launched the biggest package of tax cuts in half a century. This will involve around £45bn of reductions for people and businesses by 2027 – 50% more than anticipated before the mini-budget announcement.

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